Use Akua Intaglio inks
for all types of Etched / Intaglio Plates


Etching involves coating the surface of a copper or zinc plate with an acid-resistant ground. The printmaker draws into the ground with an etching needle to expose the metal. Then, the plate is placed in an acid bath which etches the exposed metal. The plate is inked and printed with the use of an etching press.


Steel faced etching (detail)
artist, David Finkbeiner.

Comparing Print Results
using Akua Water-based ink and Oil-based ink

In March of 2008, Master Printmaker, Tony Kirk and Susan Rostow printed a variety of plates using both oil-based and Akua Intaglio inks at the Center for Contemporary Printmaking in Norwalk Connecticut.

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View slide show of print session (includes 4 tests below)

INKING RESULTS:

The inking and wiping of the plates require the same procedures. The only difference was that Akua Intaglio inks require less time wiping than oil-based inks. The steps for inking and wiping the different types of plates varied slightly. View slide show of print session






FINISHED PRINT RESULTS

TEST 1:

Test plate with aquatint and line etching .

Result: No difference between finished prints made with oil-based and Akua Intaglio Ink.
learn more on test 1

Tony Kirk, Master Printer
examines test plate.


TEST 2:

Solarplate with image by artist, Mary Frank

Result: With modification, Akua Intaglio and the oil based final prints were indistinguishable from each other.
learn more on test 2

Solarplate print (in progress)
artist, Mary Frank

TEST 3:

Aquatint plate with image by Donald Sultan

Result: No difference between finished prints made with oil-based and Akua Intaglio Ink.
learn more on test 3

Aquatint print (in progress)
artist, Donald Sultan

TEST 4

Steel faced etching with image by David Finkbeiner.

Result: Print made with Akua  was richer.
learn more on test 4


Steel faced etching (detail)
artist, David Finkbeiner.