Steel faced etching (detail)  artist, David Finkbeiner.

Comparing Print Results using
Akua Water-based ink and Oil-based ink

In March of 2008, Master Printmaker, Tony Kirk and Susan Rostow printed a variety of plates using both oil-based and Akua Intaglio inks at the Center for Contemporary Printmaking in Norwalk Connecticut.

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View slide show of print session (includes 4 tests below)

INKING RESULTS:

The inking and wiping of the plates require the same procedures. The only difference was that Akua Intaglio inks require less time wiping than oil-based inks. The steps for inking and wiping the different types of plates varied slightly. more info


Tony Kirk inking a plate.

FINISHED PRINT RESULTS

TEST 1:

Test plate with aquatint and line etching .

Result: No difference between finished prints made with oil-based and Akua Intaglio Ink.
View slide show test 1-4

Tony examines test plate.


TEST 2:

Solarplate with image by artist, Mary Frank

Result: With modification, Akua Intaglio and the oil based final prints were indistinguishable from each other. NOTE: At first, Akua printed darker and line details were less visible due to Akua’s heavy pigment load.  To reveal the lines, 40% Akua Transparent Base mixed with 60% Akua Black reduced intensity and revealed linear detail.
View slide show test 1-4

Solarplate print (in progress)
artist, Mary Frank

TEST 3:

Aquatint plate with image by Donald Sultan


Result: No difference between finished prints made with oil-based and Akua Intaglio Ink.
View slide show test 1-4

Aquatint print (in progress)
artist, Donald Sultan

TEST 4

Steel faced etching with image by David Finkbeiner.

Result: Print made with Akua  was richer.
View slide show test 1-4

Steel faced etching (detail)
artist, David Finkbeiner.